The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare

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How does the setting influence events and characters in The Taming of the Shrew?

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shakespeareguru eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I agree with auntlori, I'm not sure that you can identify how the setting influences the characters.  You would need to actually see the characters in at least two different setting choices in order to see how any setting influences them.  Not possible from just reading the play.

You could, however compare staged and filmed productions to notice different settings and see the effect that they have on you, the audience.  You can also see what different aspects of each character are brought forth when you compare productions set in different places and times.

It should be remembered, when discussing the setting of a play, that there is nothing about the place and time that is set in stone.  Unlike a novel, the text of a play is simply the words spoken by the characters.  A setting described as Padua, for example can easily become, as in the movie and TV show 10 Things I Hate About You, Padua High School.  This TV show isn't intended as a production of The Taming of the Shrew, merely inspired by it, but the setting choice of a 21st century high school could still work for a staging of the play.

So, it's the effect of the setting on the audience you might really be interested in.  And potentially, as I mentioned above, comparing different productions with different settings in order to compare how the characters behaviour seems influenced by the settings.

 

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Lori Steinbach eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I'm not sure the setting influences the characters.  In other words, it seems unlikely to me that Shakespeare (or any playwright, for that matter) would have created these settings and then...

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