How does setting in "Araby" affect the story?

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In Joyce's "Araby ," the first setting is described in terms of figurative blindness and paralysis (the street is a dead end, etc.)  This reflects the young narrator's emotional and mental and spiritual states.  He is blinded by illusion concerning Mangan's sister, his relationship with her, and the connection...

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In Joyce's "Araby," the first setting is described in terms of figurative blindness and paralysis (the street is a dead end, etc.)  This reflects the young narrator's emotional and mental and spiritual states.  He is blinded by illusion concerning Mangan's sister, his relationship with her, and the connection between the religious and the secular.  He sees himself as a religious hero, the girl as the embodiment of the Virgin Mary, and their relationship as something holy.  He is unable to separate the religious and the secular.  He is figuratively blind.

The setting of the bazaar, Araby, later turns out not to be what he assumes it will be.  Instead of being unique and exotic, it is just a mediocre traveling exhibit that sells trinkets, sponsored by the church to make money for the church. 

This setting actually propels the narrator toward his epiphany or awakening, during which he realizes that just as Araby is an illusion, so is his idealized vision of the girl as the Virgin Mary, his view of himself as a religious hero, and his view of their relationship as something special.

In short, the dark, closed facility of the bazaar, the trivial, senseless flirting he overhears, the rudeness of the worker, and the items for sale lead the speaker to his epiphany.  Again, as Araby is not what he thought it was, neither is Mangan's sister, etc. 

In the closing lines of the story, the boy sees himself in a new way, and his eyes burn--his blindness is lifted. 

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