How does segregation help increase genetic diversity?

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The law of segregation is a principle of Mendelian genetics. The law of segregation occurs during meiosis when gametes are formed. At this time, the alleles for each gene segregate from one another. As a result, each gamete contains only one allele per gene. Thus, the gametes are haploid. The...

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The law of segregation is a principle of Mendelian genetics. The law of segregation occurs during meiosis when gametes are formed. At this time, the alleles for each gene segregate from one another. As a result, each gamete contains only one allele per gene. Thus, the gametes are haploid. The gametes need to be haploid so the specie’s diploid number is maintained when the egg and sperm unite. As a result of the law of segregation, each diploid parent passes a random allele for each trait to his/her offspring during fertilization. Thus, segregation increases variation within a species.

The law of independent assortment followed the law of segregation. The law of independent assortment states that the alleles form each gene segregate independently from one another when gametes are made. It was later found that linked genes don’t always follow this law. Needless to say, the law of independent assortment also contributes to variation within a species.

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