How does Scout use empathy (with specific events) with the following characters in To Kill a Mockingbird?Boo Radley, Calpurnia, Dolphus Raymond, and Ms. Dubose. I'm writing an essay and some help...

How does Scout use empathy (with specific events) with the following characters in To Kill a Mockingbird?

Boo Radley, Calpurnia, Dolphus Raymond, and Ms. Dubose. I'm writing an essay and some help with this would be a huge help.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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SCOUT'S EMPATHY IN TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

empathy:  Identification with and understanding of another's situation, feelings, and motives.

Boo Radley.  Scout is finally able to identify with the elusive Boo Radley after she finally meets him and stands on the Radley porch, looking out upon her neighborhood as if seeing it for the first time through Boo's eyes while standing in Boo's shoes. Scenes from the past years become clearer to Scout--how Boo must have watched over them, seeing their "heart break" over the trial, and how "Boo's children needed him" on that Halloween night,

     Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. Just standing on the Radley porch was enough.  (Chapter 31)

Calpurnia.  Scout and Calpurnia's relationship is solidified following their visit to her church, and Cal's explanations about why she speaks differently with her friends than at the Finch house seems plausible to Scout--so much so that she tells Cal that she wants to visit her own home someday.

Dolphus Raymond.  Scout recognizes that Dolphus is a "sinful man" but her own curiosity about him overwhelms her better judgement, "but he was fascinating."

Mrs. Dubose.  Scout finally came to understand that Mrs. Dubose had other reasons for wanting Jem to read to her: that she was a sick old lady who could not help her disgusting habits of drooling, gurgling, and screaming insults at them.

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