How does Scout show coming of age in the scene where she walks Arthur Radley home?

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At the beginning of the book To Kill A Mockingbird, Scout is an innocent five-year-old child with no understanding of the evils of the world. However, throughout the novel she has a variety of experiences, such as witnessing racial prejudice, that challenge her character and help her develop a...

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At the beginning of the book To Kill A Mockingbird, Scout is an innocent five-year-old child with no understanding of the evils of the world. However, throughout the novel she has a variety of experiences, such as witnessing racial prejudice, that challenge her character and help her develop a mature perspective on life. For example, Scout discovers the evil of prejudice by how it harms and destroys Boo (Arthur) Radley and Tom Robinson. However, through these experiences, Scout learns an outlook of sympathy and understanding that helps her view humanity as having a capacity not only for evil but also for good.

The scene you mentioned in your question takes place in chapter 31. Despite all the dark stories Scout has heard about Boo Radley, she walks him home, and this happens to be the last time she ever sees him. As she watches him walk into his house, she tries to view the world from his perspective. I believe this clearly shows coming of age. Even though Scout is still a child here, she truly has an adult-like understanding of the world around her. Scout’s character develops greatly throughout the novel—she starts out with the perspective of an innocent child and ends with the perspective of an experienced, loving, and accepting adult despite still being a child.

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One of the main themes throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird is gaining perspective and viewing situations from other people's point of view. In the last chapter of the book, Scout walks her neighbor, Arthur "Boo" Radley, home following an eventful night. Scout begins to notice certain locations throughout the neighborhood while standing on Boo Radley's porch. She wonders how many times Dill held onto the pole looking into the Radley house, and how many times they ran passed his gate. This is a critical moment in the novel because it displays Scout's coming of age because she finally sees Arthur "Boo" Radley as a person, and not the "creature" that rumors made him out to be. Scout laments that she and Jem never gave Boo anything back in return for all his gifts. Scout not only sees Maycomb from Boo Radley's point of view, but she understands that he is just a reclusive, shy individual who never had ill will towards anybody. Harper Lee beautifully displays Scout's coming of age during this scene by having Scout reminisce about her childhood from Boo's perspective. 

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