To Kill a Mockingbird Questions and Answers
by Harper Lee

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How does Scout mature in To Kill a Mockingbird?Please give multiple examples.

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One of the most incredible transformations in maturity is Scout's perception of Arthur "Boo" Radley. In the beginning, she sees Boo as an object of fascination—a myth more than a man. She, Jem, and Dill spend countless hours inventing games about him and trying to entice him to emerge from his home. Scout both fears and is fascinated by the idea of Boo.

Gradually, though, Scout begins to shift the way she sees Boo. In the final scene, Boo asks her to take him home in a soft whisper. Scout wants to defend Boo's integrity and says that she would never allow Boo to "lead [her] home." Instead, she asks him to bend his elbow a little so that she can slip her hand inside. This is an intentional move with foresight against the rumors generated by Miss Stephanie Crawford:

If Miss Stephanie Crawford was watching from her upstairs window, she would see Arthur Radley escorting me down the sidewalk, as any gentleman would do.

This shows a great growth in maturity compared to Scout's games involving...

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