How does Scout mature in To Kill a Mockingbird?Please give multiple examples.

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One of the most incredible transformations in maturity is Scout's perception of Arthur "Boo" Radley. In the beginning, she sees Boo as an object of fascination—a myth more than a man. She, Jem , and Dill spend countless hours inventing games about him and trying to entice...

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One of the most incredible transformations in maturity is Scout's perception of Arthur "Boo" Radley. In the beginning, she sees Boo as an object of fascination—a myth more than a man. She, Jem, and Dill spend countless hours inventing games about him and trying to entice him to emerge from his home. Scout both fears and is fascinated by the idea of Boo.

Gradually, though, Scout begins to shift the way she sees Boo. In the final scene, Boo asks her to take him home in a soft whisper. Scout wants to defend Boo's integrity and says that she would never allow Boo to "lead [her] home." Instead, she asks him to bend his elbow a little so that she can slip her hand inside. This is an intentional move with foresight against the rumors generated by Miss Stephanie Crawford:

If Miss Stephanie Crawford was watching from her upstairs window, she would see Arthur Radley escorting me down the sidewalk, as any gentleman would do.

This shows a great growth in maturity compared to Scout's games involving scissors and notes.

Scout also matures into a more genuine appreciation of her father. Early in the novel, she laments that Atticus doesn't do anything worthy of admiration:

Atticus did not drive a dump-truck for the county, he was not the sheriff, he did not farm, work in a garage, or do anything that could possibly arouse the admiration of anyone.

These views reflect a childlike view of the work Atticus does, but Scout comes to understand—at least to a greater extent—that her father works to defend values and principles for everyone, regardless of background. She is shown a visible representation of his value in the community immediately after the trial, when the black people sitting with her in the balcony all rise as Atticus walks by—and Reverend Sykes asks that she do the same to show her respect.

Thanks to Atticus, she also matures in her understanding of class differences. Although the Ewells and Cunninghams both have less money than the Finches, her views in how they differ are transformed through various conflicts. Early in the novel, she attempts to beat up Walter Cunningham because she feels he has gotten her into trouble due to his lack of lunch money. She boldly informs their teacher of the various trials of the Cunninghams due to their poverty. Later in the book, however, Aunt Alexandra calls Walter Cunningham "trash," and Scout is livid. Jem jerks her away, and Scout replies,

It was her callin' Walter Cunningham trash that got me goin’, Jem, not what she said about being a problem to Atticus. We got that all straight one time, I asked him if I was a problem and he said not much of one, at most one that he could always figure out, and not to worry my head a second about botherin' him. Naw, it was Walter—that boy’s not trash, Jem. He ain’t like the Ewells.

Scout has come to understand that wealth—or the lack thereof—doesn't determine a person's worth. She no longer feels that Walter Cunningham is a lesser person because he has less money, and that is a direct influence of watching her father interact with the Cunninghams to demonstrate respect for their hard work and values.

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Scout matures and morally develops as the story progresses by carefully listening to her father's life lessons, gaining valuable perspective on her hometown, and experiencing a loss of childhood innocence. Towards the beginning of the novel, Scout fears her reclusive neighbor, Boo Radley, and believes the rumors and neighborhood legends surrounding him. Scout also struggles to control her temper and is ignorant of her community's prejudiced culture. She also does understand the importance of Atticus's defense of Tom Robinson and is not able to recognize the hypocrisy of her neighbors and family members.

As the story progresses, Scout matures and gains perspective on her neighbors’ racist ideology and Maycomb's prejudiced community. In part 2, Scout discovers that Boo Radley is not a "malevolent phantom" and is simply a compassionate, shy neighbor. Scout also heeds her father's advice and learns to control her temper. Scout then loses her childhood innocence after witnessing racial injustice firsthand.

She realizes that Maycomb is a racist town that has a corrupt justice system. Following the trial, Scout acknowledges that Tom Robinson never had a chance to win the case. Scout also recognizes the hypocrisy throughout her community. She views Miss Gates, Mrs. Merriweather, and the other guests at Aunt Alexandra’s missionary circle as hypocrites.

Following Bob Ewell's vicious attack, Sheriff Tate explains to Atticus why he is willing to fabricate the story of Bob Ewell's death in order to protect Boo Radley from the community's limelight. Scout once again demonstrates her maturation and moral development by metaphorically applying one of Atticus's earlier lessons regarding mockingbirds.

Scout likens Boo Radley to a symbolic mockingbird and understands the importance of protecting innocent, defenseless beings. After Scout walks Boo Radley home, she finally views the neighborhood from his perspective and feels sorry for not giving Boo something in return for his kindness and sacrifice.

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In addition to those examples, Scout also shows her maturity by showing a greater depth of understanding about other townspeople. After going to church with Calpunira, Scout realizes that Calpurnia has a life outside of just taking care of the Finch family. Also, after listening to Mayella Ewell's testimony in the Tom Robinson trial, Scout's insight is that Mayella must be a very lonely person.

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Scout has to grow up quickly. When others call her father a nigger-lover, she becomes angry. When she discusses it with her father, he tells her to ignore it. Scout is used to punching someone with her fist for such name calling. She learns the harsh reality that all men are not treated equally in Maycomb.

Scout can read because her father has always read to her. This is an area of her maturity.

Scout learns to be a lady from Aunt Alexandra. She forces her to wear dresses and act lady-like.

Scout has to grow up when playing with her brother. Since he is four years older than she is, she learns so much from her older brother.

Scout learns that Boo Radley is really a caring person, even though others think he is strange, When Boo repairs or sews Jem's torn pants that he left on Boo's fence, she learns that he is caring. Also, when Boo saves Jem's life and her life, she realizes that Boo is more normal than people realize.

When Tom Robinson is not aquitted because he is black, Scout realizes that life is not fair. She learns the harsh reality that people are judged by their skin color. Scout learns that everything does not always turn out the way it should. She learns that her father can't fix everything in the trial. She is forced to mature.

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