How does Scout feel when she reflects on her relationship with Boo Radley? How would she define the responsibilities of being a neighbor?  

When Scout reflects on her relationship with Boo Radley, she is pained by the realization that she has not been a good neighbor. While Boo has created moments of beauty in their childhoods, Scout and Jem never reciprocated these efforts toward their neighbor.

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As she reflects on her relationship to Boo Radley, Scout realizes just what it means to be a neighbor. And what it means to be a neighbor involves more than just physical proximity to someone. More than anything else, it's about how you treat other people.

Looking back, Scout can see that she never treated Boo as a neighbor. Although she and Jem stopped treating Boo like he was some kind of freak or bogeyman figure, they never reciprocated his neighborly treatment of them. Boo reached out to the Finch children by leaving them little keepsakes in the knot of a tree. But the Finch children were never able to respond in kind, and that makes Scout feel sad. She understands that the relationship between neighbors is based on reciprocity, on give and take. Yet Scout and Jem took from Boo without giving anything in return. There were certainly no flowers for Boo.

Though feeling sad at her lack of neighborliness, Scout has learned a valuable lesson about what it means to be a neighbor. And although it's too late now for her to make amends, she does at least know how to conduct herself in similar situations in the future. Scout may not feel that she's been the best of neighbors to Boo, but she will be to someone else someday.

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At the novel's conclusion, Scout walks Boo Radley to his front door, where he turns the doorknob and goes inside, never to be seen again. As she stands on his porch, Scout's more mature perspective is evident in her reflections:

Neighbors bring food with death and flowers with sickness and little things in between.

Since the Finch family is traditionally Methodist, Scout is likely aligning her views of being a true neighbor with the commandment found in Mark 12:31: Love your neighbor as yourself. These acts which Scout attributes to being neighborly also show compassion and concern—or love. Neighbors try to lighten each other's burden when hardships arise. They try to brighten each other's worlds with small tokens of beauty.

Boo has done this for Scout:

Boo was our neighbor. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good-luck pennies, and our lives.

Boo has gotten to know these children without ever interacting with them. He intentionally tried to bring joy to their lives by leaving small gifts for them, those small tokens of beauty which make the world a little brighter. But Scout also realizes now that "neighbors give in return." Though Boo has come to love his neighbors, risking his own life to save theirs from the evil Bob Ewell, the children have never reached out to Boo in love. Instead, Atticus describes their interactions earlier in the book as "tormenting" the man.

This realization pains Scout. While a man with few resources and almost no interaction with society found a way to show love to Scout and Jem, they have never reciprocated these small acts of love. She now understands that being a "good" neighbor involves compassion, intentional acts of service, and, most of all, love.

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After Boo Radley saves Scout and Jem's lives by defending them against Bob Ewell's vicious attack, Scout walks Boo home and reflects on her relationship with him while she is standing on his front porch. Scout demonstrates her maturity and moral development by viewing the neighborhood from Boo Radley's perspective and reflecting on what it means to be a good neighbor. Scout mentions,

Boo was our neighbor. He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good-luck pennies, and our lives. But neighbors give in return. We never put back into the tree what we took out of it: we had given him nothing, and it made me sad. (Lee, 283)

Scout acknowledges that Boo Radley was a benevolent, generous neighbor, who gave them small gifts in the knothole of the tree and intervened when they needed his help the most. Scout then demonstrates remorse for not reciprocating Boo's kindness by putting back into the tree what they took out. Scout also experiences guilt for not giving Boo anything in return. By examining Scout's emotions and comments, one can surmise that Scout believes being a good neighbor entails a give-and-take relationship which is founded on reciprocity.

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Boo Radley saves Scout and Jem's lives when Bob Ewell attacks them. He had also reached out to them in friendship with the gifts he left for them in the knothole of the old tree. As Scout walks Boo home after the Bob Ewell attack, she reflects on their friendship. She realizes with sadness that Boo had always given to her and Jem, but they had not given him anything in return. She recalls with regret that she and Jem had never even left a single gift in the knothole for Boo:

He gave us two soap dolls, a broken watch and chain, a pair of good-luck pennies, and our lives (To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 31).

Scout wishes that she had been a better friend to Boo. She also reflects on the role of neighbors. Boo is her neighbor. She knows that she had not acted neighborly because "neighbors give in return. We never put back into the tree what we took out of it: we had given him nothing, and it made me sad." Scout feels guilty for only taking from Boo.

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