How does Salman Rushdie present magic realism in his novels, especially in Midnight's Children?

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Salman Rushdie writes about real-world events blended with mysticism and magical happenings. In Midnight's Children, the protagonist embodies this ideal because he was born right at the time that India and Pakistan were made into independent states and because he's telepathic. By presenting stories this way, Rushdie is able to make reality seem askew while still making it seem real and immediate to the reader.

The events in Midnight's Children mirror the real world. However, the inclusion of the protagonist and his narration constructs the story in such a way that even a person who lived in India during that time would not recognize it. Even though the book's sections chart different real-life occurrences in India, there is a twist to each event that makes it seem unreal or like something not of this world.

The narrator, Saleem, is born at the moment that India becomes independent; in total, 1000 children were born at that moment. All of their lives are guided by the fate of India. This is an...

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