How does Salinger use the diffrences of the poems and transform the poems content into what he needed/used? Is the title fitting? Why or why not?In what ways does Salinger use the original poem and...

How does Salinger use the diffrences of the poems and transform the poems content into what he needed/used? Is the title fitting? Why or why not?

In what ways does Salinger use the original poem and it's content to add to the story line? Please I really need help. All I can think of is that like the whole story kinda rides on how Holden views the poem.

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William Delaney | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The title of Salinger's novel, The Catcher in the Rye, is strangely suitable to the hero and his story. For one thing, he chooses an occupation that is entirely unique. Holden Caulfield is the only catcher in the rye in the entire world. This fact characterizes him as a lonely outsider and an impractical idealist but a fiercely independent thinker. He has a very kind heart. He cannot even continue to dislike any of the people he interacts with throughout the story, even people he probably should dislike. The fact that he has an immature fantasy about being a guardian of children at play suggests that he might be mentally evolving to fit into the role of a teacher and also into the role of a parent at some time in the future.

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