How does Romeo compare banishment to death?

Romeo compares banishment to death by explaining that both involve torture and living without Juliet. Although he met her just days earlier, Romeo believes that a life without Juliet is not a life worth living.

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When Friar Laurence tells Romeo that the Prince has decided to have him banished from Verona rather than executed for killing Tybalt, Romeo compares his sentence to death. While Friar Laurence believes that Romeo is being melodramatic and ungrateful, Romeo sees being banished as "purgatory, torture, hell itself," because it...

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When Friar Laurence tells Romeo that the Prince has decided to have him banished from Verona rather than executed for killing Tybalt, Romeo compares his sentence to death. While Friar Laurence believes that Romeo is being melodramatic and ungrateful, Romeo sees being banished as "purgatory, torture, hell itself," because it means he will be separated from Juliet, who still lives in Verona and might be unwilling or unable to leave it. In the usual teenage fashion, he refutes all of the Friar's attempts to calm him, because he claims that the Friar cannot understand the passionate love he feels for Juliet (he literally says, "Thou canst not speak of that thou dost not feel").

Ever since the two met at the Capulet ball, Juliet has become Romeo's central focus, and being with her is his primary goal. Friar Laurence describes the world outside of Verona as "broad," implying that Romeo will find meaning beyond the life he knew in the city, but Romeo only wishes to be with Juliet. He compares himself with stray animals and insects that may remain in Verona and see Juliet, suggesting that such an existence is preferable to living without her at all. His reaction is a reflection of his passionate nature as well as a chilling foreshadowing of his final, desperate actions when he believes that he has lost Juliet to death itself.

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