How does Robert Frost use "The Road Not Taken" and "Mending Wall" to comment on society?

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In "Mending Wall," the speaker considers telling his neighbor, "Something there is that doesn't love a wall, / That wants it down." In other words, he has a desire not to be restricted; he does not like feeling confined by walls when there seems to be no good reason to wall something in or out. Of course, the speaker's neighbor feels the opposite, that "Good fences make good neighbors"; he would rather keep himself to himself, neatly separated from others' property and others in general. There are, ultimately, then, two types of people: those who embrace boundaries and those who prefer to live outside of such limits.

In "The Road Not Taken ," there are two roads that we might take, symbolizing two choices we might make. Each one looks a little different from the other, but "the passing there / Had worn them really about the same." In other words, then, about the same number of people have traveled each road (or made each choice). The speaker, as if to reinforce this, says, "both that...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 755 words.)

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