In The Kite Runner, how does the relationship between Amir and Baba change when they move to America?    

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Baba and Amir have a strained relationship in their homeland. Baba is extremely successful and is condescending towards Amir's interests, wishing him to be more practical and enterprising. Things change when the two move to America.

Upon moving to America, Baba's health deteriorates over time, and his wealth is completely...

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Baba and Amir have a strained relationship in their homeland. Baba is extremely successful and is condescending towards Amir's interests, wishing him to be more practical and enterprising. Things change when the two move to America.

Upon moving to America, Baba's health deteriorates over time, and his wealth is completely lost. He has to start from scratch with a gas station, trying to earn enough money for a home and car. His newfound humble situation changes his attitude, and Amir changes as well.

Amir begins to grow more confident—in America he has more opportunities to pursue things in which he is interested, and he becomes somewhat popular and successful—at least more so than he was originally. This endears him to the newly-humble Baba, who shows him more respect and care than he had ever before. Because they have left servant Hassan behind as well, there was no one against whom Amir would be compared so often.

As they live in America longer, the two spend more time together. This time helps them to grow closer, and they eventually become relatively tight-knit and fond of one another. Amir grows to respect his father more for the struggles he has encountered and endured.

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Amir and Baba's relationship dramatically improves once they immigrate to the United States and begin their new lives in Fremont, California. While growing up in Kabul, Baba continually ignores his son, and Amir feels neglected and unloved. After the Russians invade Afghanistan, Baba sacrifices his business and lifestyle in order to give Amir a second chance at life in America. In America, Baba is forced to work a laborious, low-paying job and struggles to assimilate. Since Baba is alone and lives in close proximity to Amir in their tiny apartment, their relationship gradually improves, as Baba relies on Amir to communicate and help him get by in America.

As Amir matures, he becomes more confident. As his relationship continues to grow with his father, so too does his self-esteem. Baba and Amir also spend more time together at the San Jose flea market, where they socialize with other Afghan immigrants and sell miscellaneous items. Although Baba disagrees with some of Amir's decisions as a young adult, he is pleased that his son finds a beautiful bride, who comes from a respected, traditional Afghan family. After Baba is diagnosed with cancer, Amir takes care of him, and his efforts to comfort his father demonstrate Amir's love for Baba. Although immigrating to America is a rough transition, Baba and Amir's relationship dramatically improves once they arrive in the United States.

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When Amir and Baba left Afghanistan, Amir was still a young boy. During the time he and his father spent in California, Amir grew into a mature, confident young man. He continued his love of writing and eventually graduated from college and got married. This transition from boy to man sat well with Baba, and he came to admire his son. The two of them lived together and bonded as they had never done in Kabul, sharing their weekends and working at the San Jose flea market. Although Amir never grew into the strong, physical man that Baba had been (and had hoped for in his son), the son made his father proud, and the two men grew closer than they had ever been. Amir's engagement and eventual marriage to Soraya gave Baba one last gift of happiness, presenting him with a daughter (-in-law) that Baba never had, as well as a closer relationship with General Taheri, who like Baba, had been a powerful man in his homeland before immigrating to America. Just as Baba had taken care of Amir when he was young, Amir tended to Baba in his final days, and Amir's love for his father was evident at the end--something that was not always present as a boy growing up in Kabul. 

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Amir becomes more Americanized, while Baba loses the power he enjoyed in Afghanistan. The characters both must adapt to the new culture so Baba relies more on Amir while still clinging to his Afghan culture. Eventually, the tensions between the two, which defined their relationship in Afghanistan, eases. Baba remains stubborn, but respect for his son grows.

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