An Inspector Calls by J. B. Priestley

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How does Priestley explore the importance of social class in An Inspector Calls?

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Priestly explores the importance of social class in this play by showing how the wealthy Birling family is shielded from the consequences of their actions towards the lower classes. The lower classes are represented by a young woman who is harmed in turned by all of the Birlings, as well as by Sheila Birling's fiancé, Gerald Croft, without any of them being fully aware of what they have done to her. Their wealth and privilege shields them from their wrong-doing and allows them to think they are good and moral people when, in fact, they are moral hypocrites.

They are exposed when an Inspector Goole (Ghoul) arrives at their home to question them about a young woman who has committed suicide. It comes out that in various ways, all the family members contributed to the desperation that caused her to kill herself. Arthur Birling, for example, fired her from her job in his factory because she asked for a raise. He was indifferent to her needs and only concerned to protect himself from paying...

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