How does the plight of those outside the "Annexe" contribute to the theme that human growth involves pain?This is part of an assignment i have to finish this summer. I'm stuck on this question, so...

How does the plight of those outside the "Annexe" contribute to the theme that human growth involves pain?

This is part of an assignment i have to finish this summer. I'm stuck on this question, so i would appreciate some help. Thanks.

Asked on by booknerd10

2 Answers | Add Yours

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

It's a very interesting question.  I think that one of the most profound elements of the work is how Anne conveys that while human beings can hide and can seek sanctuary from the outside world, they can never be fully rid of it.  The external always impacts the internal.  Anne and her family never lose sight of the fact that the persecution and tales of horror of those caught by the Nazis can, do, and will impact all of them.  Anne's own personal growth involves a great deal of pain and challenge as she strives to make sense as to why what is happening is happening.  Throughout the diary, when Anne begins to develop the concept of questioning right and wrong and seeking to establish her own vision of justice and fairness, she always comes back to what is happening outside the Annexe to help formulate her understandings of totalizing reality.  The idea here is that when we, as human beings, seek to understand who we are and the things in which we believe, we cannot do so in a vacuum and in ignorance of what is going on outside our own annexes.  Invariably, the outside world holds a great deal of impact on our own psyches and internal workings.

anthonda49's profile pic

anthonda49 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

Anne matures as she spends time confined to the Annexe, moving from a self-centered adolescent to a more concerned and caring individual. As Anne listens to news of the illness of Mr. Kleiman, the non-Jew who provided the haven for the Frank group, she worries about him. When Bep's boyfriend is to go into the German army, Anne feels sorry for her and offers advice about another young man. The constant air raids that frighten her so much make her realize that the people living outside are just as imprisoned as she is. She fears for their safety as well as her own group's. The break-ins in the offices below affect the living of the office workers as well. Anne moves from her own self interest to concern for those around her both within and beyond the Annex. Illness and food shortages affect those who provide their life-line. Anne writes little poems and cards to help keep up their spirits as well.

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