How does Paine’s initial disclaimer, in particular the last sentence, compare with the stated goals of his pamphlet? 

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Paine notes in his introduction that ideas that at first seem radical (unfashionable) come to be adopted over time, argues that the king of England has abused his power over the colonies, states that he is has done his best to avoid partisan arguments, and asserts that the cause of...

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Paine notes in his introduction that ideas that at first seem radical (unfashionable) come to be adopted over time, argues that the king of England has abused his power over the colonies, states that he is has done his best to avoid partisan arguments, and asserts that the cause of freedom is the universal cause of all of humankind.

Most particularly, he states that England's actions in fighting the colonists—"laying a Country desolate with Fire and Sword," violating the natural rights of humans, and "extirpating" (destroying) those people who defend freedom—should concern any person of "feeling." In other words, this is not a struggle in which people should believe they can stick their heads in the sand and say it is not about them. It is about all of us, he states.

Paine then adds the following disclaimer at the end of the introduction:

The Publication of this new Edition hath been delayed, with a View of taking notice (had it been necessary) of any Attempt to refute the Doctrine of Independance: As no Answer hath yet appeared, it is now presumed that none will, the Time needful for getting such a Performance ready for the Public being considerably past.

Who the Author of this Production is, is wholly unnecessary to the Public, as the Object for Attention is the Doctrine itself, not the Man. Yet it may not be unnecessary to say, That he is unconnected with any Party, and under no sort of Influence public or private, but the influence of reason and principle.

Paine's disclaimers—especially the last, in which he reassures his audience that he unconnected with any political party or partisan cause—is congruent with his stated goals. His goals are to convince people, especially Americans sitting on the fence about the Revolution, that both in terms of principle (or feeling) and in logical terms, the Revolution is right cause to support. He is making the lofty claim that the Revolution is about universal rights, not any petty personal quarrel.

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Paine's initial disclaimer—

The laying a Country desolate with Fire and Sword, declaring War against the natural rights of all Mankind, and extirpating the Defenders thereof from the Face of the Earth, is the Concern of every Man to whom Nature hath given the Power of feeling; of which Class, regardless of Party Censure, is the AUTHOR

—comes at the end of a section in which he acknowledges that the idea of the colonies breaking from Britain is an idea which has not had a long time to become widely accepted. Paine is certain that the idea will become an inevitability, as he implies in the sentence "Time makes more converts than reason." Paine will lay out a logical argument in the pamphlet, but he is conceding at the beginning of the piece that some people will require more evidence, the kind that only time and experience offer, before they will be inclined to support the revolution. This final sentence is a fiery call to arms to colonial citizens to support the cause. It indicts the British as oppressors and charges white men from all walks of American life and varying political persuasions to join the rebellion.

The stated goals of Common Sense are to persuade its readers to agree that the greater philosophical argument—not just local, regional, or colonial concerns—makes support for the American cause reasonable and defensible. Paine appeals to his audience's sense of justice for humankind, raising the cause above a squabble between a country and its colonies.

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In the closing of the initial disclaimer of Common Sense, Thomas Paine asserts that,

The laying a country desolate with fire and sword, declaring war against the natural rights of all mankind, and extirpating the defenders thereof from the face of the earth, is the concern of every man to whom nature hath given the power of feeling; of which class regardless of party censure is.

From this lengthy sentence, we see that Paine asserts that the purpose of the pamphlet transcends its particular socio-historical political circumstances.  He indicates that the tenets he puts forth in the text proper demonstrate "the natural rights of all mankind" and are of "concern" to "every man," stripping his subject of any national particularity.  

This attention to the general comes out throughout the entirety of the initial disclaimer.  For example, at the beginning of the final paragraph, Paine asserts that:

The cause of America is in a great measure the cause of all mankind.

Here, he elevates the particular "cause of America" to the more general and transcendent "cause of all mankind," mirroring his emphasis on humanity in general in the final sentence.

The generality of the first paragraph further underscores the universality of Paine's argument:

Perhaps the sentiments contained in the following pages, are not yet sufficiently fashionable to procure them general Favor; a long Habit of not thinking a Thing wrong, gives is a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of Custom.  But the tumult soon subsides.  Time makes more converts than Reason.

Both by not offering any particular subjects of these maxims and appealing to (capitalized) idealities ("Custom," "Time," "Reason"), Pain works to make his argument abstract and universal, embodying timeless truths about the nature of political societies.

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