In "1984," how does Orwell present Winston as an outsider in a rigidly controlled society?I just need help with key points that show Winstons seperation from society, the similarities and...

In "1984," how does Orwell present Winston as an outsider in a rigidly controlled society?

I just need help with key points that show Winstons seperation from society, the similarities and differences between him and the perfect party citizen, and the language techniques and parts of the book Orwell uses to show this.

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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For one thing, he thinks for himself.  He rebels in his mind and had done so for a long while.  His memories of his mother and sister help to fan the flames of his inner rebellion, and he buys a diary in which to write I HATE BIG BROTHER.  This is definitely outsider behavior. 

He thinks about the past and the fact that his job is making up the past every time the war opponent changes.  Everything is a farce, and he knows it. 

In addition, he looks for signs in others that they are thinking the same rebellion-thoughts.  He thinks he recognizes it in O'Brien, and then Julia makes her move to connect with him.  From there, he acts on his thoughts of rebellion and the "outsider" label becomes more evident.

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