How does the novel, Fahrenheit 451 make you feel?How does the novel, Fahrenheit 451 make you feel?

6 Answers | Add Yours

booboosmoosh's profile pic

booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

This novel is very exciting. I enjoy watching Montag come alive when he begins talking to Clarisse and questioning all the things he has taken at face value, and noticing things around him that he had forgotten, like nature. The story is sad, especially when we witness the unhappiness of a society that thinks it is so advanced. I hate to read about the numbness that so many (including Mildred) voluntarily give in to so they don't have to think or really feel. I dislike the oppression so many suffer simply because of books and the knowledge they hold. However, I love the fact that people are so dedicated to preserve that which society wants to destroy—because books are SO valuable in so many ways.

At the end I feel hope that we can learn from our mistakes and fix things to be better than before. That we can take something that is bad and make it new and beneficial. I love the tenacity of human nature that refuses to just stop, but forever wants to rebuild, grow and reach out to others. The novel makes me think that it's never too late to change or begin again.

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

This novel is wonderfully written, as Bradbury's choice and arrangement of language was thought provoking at the same time as it very accurately and deliberately makes its points. Taken in the early 1950s setting in which it was written, its both easy to understand why the omnipresent threat of nuclear war and conformity were the hallmarks of Bradbury's fictional society and easy to relate to in the modern day, as so much of the comparison, to me, still holds true. I think his warnings are clever and the story plausible while still remaining in the realm of science fiction.
accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Like any good dystopian literature, this novel makes me afraid, because it paints a picture of a possible world which frankly terrifies me. I can't imagine a world without books, and I would probably be one of those people who hide them and would willingly get burnt myself with my books in protest. This novel paints a world where the control of information has become so strict and tight that the government is not able to trust their population with the interpretation of such texts as novels and only allows them to have debased, devalued and dumbed down forms of entertainment. What would life be like without poetry or novels? What would our lives be like if we had to follow the empty pursuits of Mildred and her friends, if we were unable to socially interact with others? It wouldn't be a life.

herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I have always said that F451 is way too similar to things going on these days, especially- like Mshurn said- mindless enterntainment. I also fear for the fact that the story is about manipulation mainly and how a stupid mentality with an ability to manipulate can create further stupidity- isn't that the case these days, where you see people just completely copying all the negative traits of others? It is indeed a scary scenario.

mshurn's profile pic

Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

It makes me feel uneasy because of some disturbing similarities between the novel's setting and our own society, especially in regard to materialism and mindless entertainment. Since the novel is science fiction, the government control and manipulation of the people is developed in the extreme, but their loss of personal freedom is alarming nevertheless. Most disturbing of all is that the great majority is not even aware of what has been lost in their lives. Also, the government's using fear and continual warfare to control people by refocusing their attention is upsetting. Montag, however, is a reassuring figure in the novel. So long as there are people who can and will think for themselves and who will risk everything for personal freedom, all will not be lost.

epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

It makes me feel wanting for better politicians and leaders to make sure that we don't end up in the same boat; though I feel that is exactly where they are steering us.

We’ve answered 318,973 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question