How does the need for affection and companionship affect the actions in "Frankenstein" for Frankenstein and the creature?How does the need to confide in another affect the characters in the text? ...

How does the need for affection and companionship affect the actions in "Frankenstein" for Frankenstein and the creature?

How does the need to confide in another affect the characters in the text?  How does Frankenstein and the creature relate for the need for contact, relationship, friendship, or affection?

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Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In many ways, the development of emotional consciousness is a critical element in the text.  The monster seeks to become a one- dimensional figure when he sees the children playing, the villagers sharing collective consciousness, and understands that he is cursed to live alone, devoid of connection to others.  It is at this moment that the reader fully grasps what Victor has done for he has created something that did not ask to be brought into the world.  Rather, he was thrown on the stage with a glaring spotlight without direction nor script and told to "Act."  The need for connection and emotional attachment creates a spirit of empathy for the monster and, in my mind, a certain level of disdain for Victor.  I would suggest that it is this same connection that allows Victor to understand, as well.  However, his understanding is that when he sees the destruction wrought by the monster, Victor feels connected to his fellow human beings in wanting to see it destroyed.  This is in stark contrast to the start of the novel, where Victor values science, isolation in a laboratory, and his ideas more than people.   The need for contact and emotions play a vital role in how characters like the Monster and Victor relate to the world and relate to their own emotional selves, and represents a strong level of indictment to both the Enlightenment's and Romanticism's glorification of separation from society.

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Frankenstein

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