How does William Faulkner reveal his personal struggles in life through Miss Emily's isolation and loneliness in "A Rose for Emily"?I have been searching and searching and I can't find any...

How does William Faulkner reveal his personal struggles in life through Miss Emily's isolation and loneliness in "A Rose for Emily"?

I have been searching and searching and I can't find any personal information about William Faulkner's personal struggles in his own life except that he drank some, and what I did find on this did not give me enough background to help me.  I am using Miss Emily's struggle with isolation and loneliness in my paper and I have to show how Hawthorne revealed his own struggles through this.  Any guidance or imput would be greatly appreciated!

Asked on by kerrierg

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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To be honest, Hawthorne more than Faulkner was renowned for his struggles with isolation and loneliness in the world. Therefore, I don't necessarily think we can establish a link between Faulkner's personal struggles and the struggles he gives Miss Emily. You are right identifying that Miss Emily is isolated and cast adrift from the world that she is a part, but Faulker does this to indicate that she is a relic of another age that has passed away--she is a living anachronism, indicated by his description of her as a floating corpse, bloated in the sea. It is through her life that Faulkner charts the passing of traditional values of the Old South, such as the chivalry expressed by Colonel Sartoris when he lets her off paying taxes because she is a "lady." You might want to think about the way that the beginning of the story describes Miss Emily as a "fallen monument" in her death - she is the last legacy of a time long gone. It is this message that Faulkner is trying to establish through her isolation, and is a key theme in much of his literature, rather than expressing his own isolation.

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