The Horse Dealer's Daughter by D. H. Lawrence

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In "The Horse Dealer's Daughter," how does the narrative voice suit the story's effect? This story is told in the third person narrative and I am wondering how this suits the effect of the story.

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The short story "The Horse Dealer's Daughter" by D. H. Lawrence tells of a family of four children whose father has just died. Since he was in debt, they are losing their house and property. The three brothers have ways to cope, but the sister, Mabel (the daughter of the horse dealer), is depressed and desolate. She goes to visit her mother's grave and then walks into a pond to drown herself. A young doctor named Jack Fergusson, who had stopped by their house earlier, observes Mabel going under the pond water, saves her, and carries her back to the house. Then, when he revives her, she insists he loves her, and he returns her love.

It is true that this story is told from the third-person point of view. Lawrence uses this perspective because his intention is to delve deeply into the thoughts and motivations of various characters in turn. However, Lawrence does not employ third-person omniscient point of view, in which readers can see the thoughts of all the characters at once, but rather...

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