How does Mr. Enfield describe Mr. Hyde in the first chapter of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?  

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In the frightening gothic novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hydeby Robert Louis Stevenson , the author first introduces the evil Mr. Hyde indirectly while two characters named Mr. Utterson and Mr. Richard Enfield are out for a walk. As they pass "a certain sinister block...

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In the frightening gothic novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, the author first introduces the evil Mr. Hyde indirectly while two characters named Mr. Utterson and Mr. Richard Enfield are out for a walk. As they pass "a certain sinister block of building," Enfield recalls an incident he witnessed at "about three o'clock of a black winter morning." Stevenson chooses to introduce Mr. Hyde, the dark alter-ego of Dr. Jekyll, in this indirect way, first through a description of a horrific deed that Hyde perpetrates, and then by a description of Mr. Hyde himself.

What Mr. Hyde does tells more about his character than what he looks like. According to Enfield, Hyde and a girl of about 10 were moving swiftly towards a corner from opposite directions, and they inevitably ran into each other. Instead of stopping, Hyde "trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on the ground." Enfield grabbed Hyde and brought him back to the crowd that was gathering. At this point, Enfield says that Hyde gave him an ugly look, and Enfield declares that he had "taken a loathing" to Hyde at first sight. Hyde eventually delivers a check for the girl's family from the account of Dr. Jekyll.

After Enfield has finishes his story, Utterson asks him what Hyde looked like. Enfield replies that he is difficult to describe, that "there is something wrong with his appearance." He is displeasing, detestable, and deformed. "He gives a strong feeling of deformity." In other words, Enfield describes Hyde as someone who gives the impression that there is something terribly wrong with him, yet at the same time he is unable to give details. He says that even though as they speak he can remember Hyde and envision him in his mind's eye, he insists that he "can't describe him." It is as if Hyde personifies evil, but that personification does not take a distinct shape with sharp features.

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When Mr. Enfield spots a particular door on his walk with Mr. Utterson, he tells the story of the peculiar man he once knew to be connected with it. He calls Mr. Hyde a "little man who was stumping along" the street, and when this man ran into a little girl, he "trampled calmly over the child's body and left her screaming on the ground." Hyde is clearly completely callous and lacks compassion for other human beings, even children. Mr. Enfield says that the sight was "hellish to see" and that Mr. Hyde "wasn't like a man" at all but "like some damned Juggernaut." Mr. Enfield says that Hyde gave him such an "ugly" look that it "brought out the sweat on [him] like running." In other words, Mr. Hyde seemed to make him very nervous and to get his heart rate up, like he had been running: a curious response. A doctor came to examine the little girl and to make sure that she would be all right, and when Mr. Enfield looked at the doctor, he could see the physician "turn sick and white with desire to kill [Hyde]." Apparently, then, Mr. Hyde has an equally curious effect on others. Mr. Hyde himself had "a kind of black, sneering coolness," and Mr. Enfield even compares the ugly little man to Satan himself. Mr. Enfield calls Hyde "a really damnable man," and he alleges that he has never seen a man he "so disliked, and yet [he] scarce[ly] know[s] why." Finally, Mr. Enfield describes Hyde as "deformed," saying that he gives a "strong feeling of deformity," though Enfield cannot say exactly how. Hyde's physical appearance seems to elude description—except that he looks "extraordinary," though indescribably so.

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In Chapter One, Mr. Enfield tells of how he came across the detestable Mr. Hyde one bleak winter morning. At the time, Mr. Hyde had callously trampled over a little girl and was fast making his getaway when Mr. Enfield apprehended him.

To Mr. Enfield, Mr. Hyde was a grotesque character who elicited revulsion from anyone who chose to look upon him. Ironically, Mr. Hyde appeared to exhibit no remorse for his horrendous act of cruelty; he faced the family of the little girl coolly, as if he had nothing for which to be ashamed of. Mr. Enfield admits that even the doctor who tended to the young child had difficulty holding back his feelings of violence against Mr. Hyde. In short, Mr. Hyde actually inspired murder in the hearts of both Mr. Enfield and the doctor that fateful morning.

Since murder was out of the question, the doctor, Mr. Enfield, and all other interested parties demanded that Mr. Hyde make some sort of financial restitution for his reprehensible act. The figure of a hundred pounds was mentioned, and even though Mr. Hyde would have liked to bargain for less, the menace of the angry crowd prevented him from further arguing his position. Eventually, Mr. Hyde did make good on the payment, but Mr. Enfield still classed him as a 'really damnable man,' unworthy of society's esteem.

Later, Mr. Enfield confides to his friend, Mr. Utterson, that although there was something 'displeasing' and 'downright detestable' about Mr. Hyde, he couldn't quite put his finger on what exactly made the man such a sinister figure. According to Mr. Enfield, Mr. Hyde gives the impression of someone who is deformed in some way, yet the fact is not evident just by looking at him. He is an 'extraordinary man' to look at and nondescript in appearance at the same time. Mr. Enfield is frustrated that he can't accurately describe Mr. Hyde nor explain his own loathing of the man. However, he maintains that everyone who looks upon Mr. Hyde immediately takes a violent dislike to him.

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The way that Mr. Enfield describes Mr. Hyde is kind of chilling.  He describes Hyde both in terms of his looks and in terms of his behavior.  Both seem a bit shocking and scary.

First, he says that Hyde is like a "damn juggernaut."  Like he was just single-mindedly pushing ahead and was unstoppable as he ran over the little girl.

He says that Hyde looked so evil that even the doctor could not bear to look at him without wanting to kill him.  Enfield goes on to say that he cannot really say why, but that Hyde gave the impression of being deformed in some way.

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