How does Minerva change as a person throughout In the Time of the Butterflies?I need help finding one descriprive passage from each of the three sections in order to find out how Minerva changes...

How does Minerva change as a person throughout In the Time of the Butterflies?

I need help finding one descriprive passage from each of the three sections in order to find out how Minerva changes throughou the book. Quotes and page numbers are needed too.

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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Minerva goes from being brash and headstrong, seeing the world only in black and white, to understanding shades of gray, and finally, to making the ultimate sacrificie for others, her life. 

Ch 2, 20:  "Until the nail is hit, it doesn't believe in the hammer."  Until Minerva hears the tales of Trujillo's atrocities from her friend Sinita and then witnesses what happens to her friend at school, she does not believe the dictator they had been taught to believe could be so horrible. 

Ch 6, 92:  "And as I said those words, my woman's eyes sprang open."  Minerva has learned about her father's second family.  Like her opinions of Trujillo, Minerva had a very childlike understanding of the complications of love.  She begins to see her father as fallible human being.  Even though she doesn't approve, she begins to see how life becomes complicated.

Ch 12, 289:  "I felt a flush of embarassment to be caught shopping when I should have been planning a revolution."  Minerva is growing in that she has eased up a bit, and is letting some of the small pleasures of life accompany her desire for political action.

Secondly, just hours before her death, Minerva realizes that her friend, Rufino, has a family who loves him and is anxiously awaiting his safe return. Minerva muses, "It struck me I had never asked him how old the child was, boy or girl."  (Ch 12, 296)

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