'How does Miller present John and Elizabeth Proctors' relationship and the ways in which it changes' The ideas i have so far are:- it creates tension and lack of trust in their relationship-...

'How does Miller present John and Elizabeth Proctors' relationship and the ways in which it changes'

The ideas i have so far are:
- it creates tension and lack of trust in their relationship
- Suspicion
- throughout the play they try to rectify the situation
- Elizabeth starts blaming herself
I need some help trying to find examples of these ideas and possibly a few more ideas? 

Expert Answers
Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I think that you are on the right track with your initial beliefs.  I might also suggest that there might be a statement being made about how individuals must be "right" with their own senses of self before being "right" with another.  John Proctor might be an example of this.  At the start of the play, he is shown to have regret about his relationship with Abigail, yet lacking a sense of moral absolution about right and wrong.  Essentially, John is shown to live in a world of gray where there is ambiguity all around him.  As the political and social climates of Salem become more brutally insane, Proctor begins to assume a moral and politically extraordinary stance in a setting where this becomes extremely rare.  It is in this transformation that he begins to become "right" with his sense of justice and his own moral code about what it means to stand for something.  It is also at this point where he and Elizabeth begin to share a deeper emotional connection within one another.  The changing of their relationship to one fraught with silence that precluded real emotional exchange is one that is replaced with an emotional setting where both completely understand one another and how the appeal to a higher moral code is something both share with and for one another.

mroconnor100 | Student

“Spare me!  You forget nothin' and forgive nothin'.  Learn charity, woman.  I have gone tiptoe in this house...I have not moved from there to there without I think to please you, and still an everlasting funeral marches round your heart.  I cannot speak but I am doubted, every moment judged for lies, as though I come into a court when I come into this house" (Act II, Scene 1).

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The Crucible

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