In Macbeth, how does Macduff describe the turmoil in Scotland?

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Macduff paints a pretty grim picture of life in Scotland under Macbeth. At this stage in his reign, Macbeth has earned the reputation of a brutal, blood-thirsty tyrant, and plans are already underfoot to topple him from power. Under Macbeth's bloody tyranny, widows howl, new orphans cry, and each...

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Macduff paints a pretty grim picture of life in Scotland under Macbeth. At this stage in his reign, Macbeth has earned the reputation of a brutal, blood-thirsty tyrant, and plans are already underfoot to topple him from power. Under Macbeth's bloody tyranny, widows howl, new orphans cry, and each day brings new sorrow to the nation. Malcolm responds to Macduff's litany of woes by pretending that he isn't interested in fighting Macbeth, prompting Macduff into a howl of despair:

Bleed, bleed, poor country!
Great tyranny, lay thou thy basis sure,
For goodness dare not check thee. (Act IV Scene iii).
But Malcolm was just trying to feel out Macduff, to test his loyalty to the cause of overthrowing Macbeth. Macduff's anguished outburst proves to Malcolm's satisfaction that he does indeed care about Scotland and is a good man prepared to stand up and fight against Macbeth.
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In Act 4 Scene 3 of Macbeth, Macduff describes the turmoil in Scotland.  He tells Malcolm that Scotland is under the control of a tyrant and that many senseless deaths have occurred.  He says that the nation is miserable and hopeless because Macbeth is not the rightful king of the land.  The men do not feel safe under Macbeth's rule.  Macduff cries for his country.  When Rosse arrives and reports that Macduff's family has been murdered, the men immediately suspect that Macbeth is responsible, and Macduff blames himself for being absent.  The men vow to take back Scotland and return peace to the land.

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