How does Macbeth feel toward his friend Banquo?

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Macbeth's feeling towards Banquo change drastically through the course of the play. In the early scenes, Banquo and Macbeth fight side by side to defeat the forces of Ireland and MacDonald. They trust each other and respect one another as servants to the king.

The two men later encounter ...

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Macbeth's feeling towards Banquo change drastically through the course of the play. In the early scenes, Banquo and Macbeth fight side by side to defeat the forces of Ireland and MacDonald. They trust each other and respect one another as servants to the king.

The two men later encounter the witches. First the witches describe Macbeth's future as king; then they describe how Banquo's posterity will become kings.

The two men remain friends after this; perhaps the secret even brings them more together. Later, however, when Macbeth is driven to murder his king, Banquo quickly begins to distrust him. At the same time, Macbeth remembers the prophecy that Banquo's children will become kings. This makes him wonder why his own lineage will not remain in power. He distrusts Banquo, but continues to pretend to be his friend.

Eventually, Banquo accuses Macbeth of foul play outright:

           "thou hast it now: King, Cawdor, Glamis, all,

            As the weird women promised, and I fear

           Thou play'dst most foully for 't."

Macbeth becomes fearful that Banquo will try to usurp his rule, and he has his old friend killed. 

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