In Macbeth, how does Lennox use punctuation to express his angry attitude and sarcastic tone towards the murder of Duncan and Banquo in his speech with another Lord? Act 3 scene 6.Especially in...

In Macbeth, how does Lennox use punctuation to express his angry attitude and sarcastic tone towards the murder of Duncan and Banquo in his speech with another Lord? Act 3 scene 6.

Especially in line 10 "damned fact!" I can't seem to explain it. Thank you for your help.

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In Act 3, Scene 6 of Shakespeare's Macbeth Lennox clearly believes that Macbeth was faking it when he killed the two servants.

 Men must not walk too late.

Who cannot want the thought, how monstrous

It was for Malcolm and for Donalbain

To kill their gracious father? Damned fact!(10)

How it did grieve Macbeth! (pdf p. 55)

His punctuation increases the satire.  His including “Damned fact!” on the same line, line 10, he is demonstrating that he does not think that they actually killed their father.  Instead, he is sarcastically reinforcing that it is not a fact, but just an excuse for Macbeth to kill the servants and divert suspicion. 

Did he not straight,

In pious rage, the two delinquents tear,

That were the slaves of drink and thralls of sleep?

Was not that nobly done? Ay, and wisely too,

For ’twould have anger'd any heart alive(15)

To hear the men deny't. (p. 55)

The ironic and sarcastic “pious rage” is funny, and again, “did he not straight” then comma, then “in pious rage” gives the reader and audience (and his companion) time to realize he is being sarcastic.

Sources:

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