My Oedipus Complex

by Frank O'Connor
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How does Larry feel about his father at the end of "My Oedipus Complex"?

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Frank O’Connor’s story follows a young boy, Larry, who has to get used to having his father in the house again. While he was away serving in the military during World War I, he made rare visits home, but with peacetime, he resumes living with Larry and his mother. Despite...

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Frank O’Connor’s story follows a young boy, Larry, who has to get used to having his father in the house again. While he was away serving in the military during World War I, he made rare visits home, but with peacetime, he resumes living with Larry and his mother. Despite his tender years, Larry had gotten used to feeling that he was the man of the house who was responsible for taking care of his mother. He fails to see that through his extreme emotional dependence on his mother, he is actually behaving like a younger boy. When his father comes home, Larry intends to be generous but is consumed with jealousy. While he had been in the habit of falling asleep in his parents’ bed, now he is banished, as his father is sleeping there with her. He asks his mother if his father can go back to the war, and tells his father that he will marry his mother when he is grown.

Things take a sudden turn, however, when his mother gets pregnant. Her changing appearance and the anticipation of a new sibling on the way do not make Larry happy. When the baby brother, called Sonny, is born, Larry and his father form new bonds of solidarity, as the mother’s attention is totally focused on the infant. While he and his father grow closer, Larry also feels sorry for him for being displaced.

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