How does Lady Macbeth greet Duncan upon his arrival at Inverness in William Shakespeare's Macbeth

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Lady Macbeth greets Duncan in a manner entirely befitting a visiting dignitary. She treats the king with becoming respect and humility, going out of her way to make him feel welcome in the Macbeths' stately castle. This is all part of Lady Macbeth's devious plan to lull Duncan into a false sense of security. He must never suspect that there's anything wrong; he must be completely relaxed and comfortable in the place where he will spend his last few hours on earth.

Taking her own advice and acting like an "innocent flower," Lady Macbeth is the very epitome of humility and charm as she greets her VIP guest:

All our service,
In every point twice done and then done double,
Were poor and single business to contend
Against those honors deep and broad wherewith
Your majesty loads our house. For those of old,
And the late dignities heaped up to them,
We rest your hermits. (1.6.14–20)

Lady Macbeth is really laying the obsequiousness on with a trowel here. In the above excerpt she claims that even if everything that she and her husband are doing for Duncan were done twice over, it would be nothing compared to the honors that the king has brought to their family.

Shamelessly curtseying before the man she's about to have killed, she gives the impression that everything's on the up-and-up. This particular scene shows Lady Macbeth at her dissimulating best. She's clearly very good at hiding her true intentions, which is absolutely essential if the murder plot is to go off without a hitch. Whereas Macbeth is still uncertain and vacillating, his wife is confident and decisive.

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Lady Macbeth's method of greeting of Duncan reflects the advice she had given earlier to her husband. As she states at the end of act 1, scene 5:

Look like th' innocent flower,

But be the serpent under it.

Thus, when Duncan arrives at the castle in act 1, scene 6, Lady Macbeth plays the role of a loyal subject welcoming her king and offering hospitality to her guests. As for Duncan himself, he has no suspicion of any ulterior motives (nor does he necessarily have any cause for such suspicion). It is this tension that creates dramatic irony in this scene: we, the readers, know of Lady Macbeth's true intentions, even as Duncan remains blind to her deception.

This treatment sets the stage for the next scene, when Macbeth is set to carry out the murder (and has a crisis of conscience concerning it). Ultimately, note that Duncan's murder is carried out after he has gone to sleep (when he was in a point of vulnerability). Thus, this deception, which we see present in act 1, scene 6, extends well beyond that initial welcoming of Duncan into the castle. Macbeth and Lady Macbeth continue to present themselves as loyal subjects and gracious hosts, and through this deception, they are able to murder the king and usurp the throne. This murder and usurpation will shape the remainder of the play.

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When King Duncan arrives at Inverness Castle, Lady Macbeth greets the king in an unctuous, ingratiating manner.

All our service,
In every point twice done and then done double,
Were poor and single business to contend
Against those honors deep and broad wherewith
Your majesty loads our house. (1.6.14-18)
Lady Macbeth speaks to King Duncan in this manner in order to deceive the ruler into believing that they are grateful to him for Macbeth's new position as Thane of Cawdor. Lady Macbeth states that they have cleaned and prepared for the occasion of Duncan's arrival most thoroughly and they wish him to be comfortable in their house. This flattery is done in order to deceive King Duncan into thinking that Macbeth is a loyal subject and that he is fond of Duncan.
 
Before the king has entered Inverness, Duncan remarks that the castle of Macbeth "sweetly recommends itself" (1.6.2). However, the nobleman Banquo, who has been with Macbeth and witnessed the three witches and heard their predictions, is not so easily deceived, and he suspects the motives of the Macbeths because he knows what the other predictions of the witches have been, especially the one in which the witches tell Macbeth he will be king.
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Lady Macbeth, in act one (scene six) of William Shakespeare's Macbeth, welcomes King Duncan into their (Macbeth's and her) home. She is overly welcoming. She states that everything has been double checked and double checked again in order to insure everything is in order for the king's visit. Duncan calls Lady Macbeth an honored hostess, and she proves to be very honorable (at least to his face). 

Lady Macbeth most likely greets the king by herself because Macbeth is most likely contemplating the murder of Duncan. Later, she will take Duncan to meet Macbeth (probably as what would be custom in the times). 

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