How does Julius Caesar show that he is stoic in this quote?

I could be well moved if I were as you.If I could pray to move, prayers would move me.But I am constant as the Northern Star,Of whose true fixed and resting qualityThere is no fellow in the firmament.The skies are painted with unnumbered sparks;They are all fire, and every one doth shine;But there’s but one in all doth hold his place.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Zeno of Citium founded the philosophy of stoicism in the early 3rd century BC.  A main tenet of the original philosophy was to avoid destructive emotions.  There was a heavy emphasis on logical reasoning and self control.  The emphasis on avoiding destructive emotions is important to notice, because most people...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Zeno of Citium founded the philosophy of stoicism in the early 3rd century BC.  A main tenet of the original philosophy was to avoid destructive emotions.  There was a heavy emphasis on logical reasoning and self control.  The emphasis on avoiding destructive emotions is important to notice, because most people believe that being a stoic means avoiding all emotions.  Or at least not showing any emotions.  

Julius Caesar's quote shows elements of stoicism, because it reflects steady self control.  Caesar is saying that he is steady and unchanging.  He isn't easily moved by emotions or prayers.  Caesar compares his steadfastness with the North Star.  The North Star is positioned directly over Earth's geographic north pole, so that when the earth spins, the North Star appears to remain in a steady, constant position.  Of all of the stars visible in the northern hemisphere, it is the most constant and unchanging.  It is the most self controlled star.  It is stoic in nature just like Caesar.  

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team