How does Jonas show integrity, wisdom, intelligence, courage, and "the capacity to see beyond" in The Giver?

Jonas shows integrity in The Giver in his dream-telling sessions with his parents. He demonstrates wisdom as he determines to change his community. Jonas shows courage when he leaves the community for Elsewhere. The "capacity to see beyond" is not understood by the majority of the community, because they are deprived of seeing in color. Jonas doesn't understand this either, until the Giver provides additional memories of the color red, which Jonas has already begun to see.

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Jonas shows great integrity in his daily interactions in the community, which is one reason he is singled out as a potential Receiver of Memory. Jonas follows the rules, is always prompt, and confesses his shortcomings as required. One example is the time when Jonas had a sexual dream about...

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Jonas shows great integrity in his daily interactions in the community, which is one reason he is singled out as a potential Receiver of Memory. Jonas follows the rules, is always prompt, and confesses his shortcomings as required. One example is the time when Jonas had a sexual dream about Fiona. Since telling parents about their dreams is required of all children, Jonas follows through, even though he considers this an awkward conversation he would rather avoid. And, in fact, his parents would never have known if he had kept this information to himself. Yet Jonas is honest and reports his dreams of "wanting" to his parents immediately, as required.

Jonas demonstrates great wisdom and intelligence as he begins to evaluate their community's common beliefs. This becomes especially evident after Jonas receives the memories of grandparents and love. Although he doesn't immediately see the value of this former way of life, these memories ignite a desire in Jonas to change their society. He carefully thinks about his society and evaluates how the lack of love impacts their relationships. He comes to understand based on the wisdom he acquires that it is worth risking pain in order to gain love.

Jonas's moment of greatest courage is when he decides to leave the community with Gabriel so that the memories can be released to the people. He doesn't really know what he will find Elsewhere, and he certainly isn't well-skilled in taking care of an infant. He isn't sure how long they will have to travel and finds that the weather is harsh. Jonas has lived a predictable, safe, and pain-free life for his twelve years and chooses to intentionally walk into the unknown so that he can both save his community from a meaningless existence and so that he can save Gabriel's life.

The "capacity to see beyond" is one of the traits that marks Jonas as a likely potential Receiver of Memory. He comes to understand that his community is deprived of seeing in color, and Jonas notices that he can see the color red first by noticing how an apple "changes" as he tosses it with Asher. He doesn't understand the quality of color until the Giver explains it to him later, giving him another memory with the color red.

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Jonas demonstrates integrity by his willingness to do the right thing when he is confronted with adversity. In the novel, Jonas is portrayed as an honest, morally upright adolescent who is relatively obedient and stands out among his peers. Jonas reveals his integrity by carefully choosing correct language, obeying the community rules, and being honest with his parents in regards to revealing his dreams and emotions. After witnessing the release of a newborn, Jonas refuses to go back home and comes up with a plan to change the community for the better. Jonas truly believes that life was better before Sameness and is willing to risk his life to benefit the community.

Jonas also demonstrates wisdom and intelligence after each of his training sessions with the Giver. Jonas recognizes the duality of human existence and grasps abstract concepts like independence, individuality, creativity, and identity. He begins to realize that it is imperative that the community's way of life changes for the better, and he takes the necessary steps to accomplish his task.

Jonas demonstrates his courage through his ability to withstand emotional and physical pain during his training sessions. Although Jonas has his share of pleasurable experiences, he also experiences pain, hunger, war, terror, loneliness, and fear. Jonas courageously perseveres and continues his difficult training as the next Receiver of Memory.

Jonas also has the Capacity to See Beyond and is one of the few citizens in the community who can see in color. Jonas initially begins to see the color red while tossing an apple to Asher. He also notices Fiona's red hair and is initially unsure about what he is experiencing until the Chief Elder explains to him that he has the Capacity to See Beyond.

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Jonas shows integrity throughout the book by being honest and demonstrating that he is a good person.

Integrity refers to the fact that someone is a good person. Jonas shows he is a good person not by following rules blindly, but by doing what he feels in his heart is right. 

The Receiver of Memory has to be someone who stands out from the crowd.  In a community that embraces Sameness, that is quite a lot to ask.  When searching for the new Receiver to train, the community elders need to ensure that the person has integrity and can make moral decisions on his or her own, because there are no moral decisions to be made in the community on a daily basis.  There are rules governing every kind of behavior.  People don’t make choices, so they don’t need to have integrity.

When the Chief Elder is listing the important traits the Receiver has to have, she lists intelligence first and integrity second.

"Integrity" she said next. "Jonas has, like all of us, committed minor transgressions." She smiled at him. "We expect that. We hoped, also, that he would present himself promptly for chastisement, and he has always done so. (Ch. 8, p. 62)

It is hard to determine who is a good person or not deep down, so one way the committee can tell is that when Jonas does something wrong, he owns up to it.  This is how they know he has integrity.

Jonas’s integrity becomes an important part of the story when he learns that his community is not as perfect as he thought.  The murder of the newborn twin at the hands of his father tells him that something is terribly wrong.  He risks his own life and breaks the rules to escape and save baby Gabe, and return the memories to the community so they can make their own choices.  That’s real integrity.

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