How does Jody's sense of responsibility help him to enjoy his experiences in raising the fawn in The Yearling?I am a mom trying to help my daughter write a book report.  I do not want to write it...

How does Jody's sense of responsibility help him to enjoy his experiences in raising the fawn in The Yearling?

I am a mom trying to help my daughter write a book report.  I do not want to write it for her but since I have not read  the book I do not know how to answer the question myself.  

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bullgatortail eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Jody Baxter has spent most of his young life attending to chores in the Florida wilderness of Baxter's Island in Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings' novel, The Yearling. His parents bring him up in an atmosphere of love and simplicity, but loneliness often overwhelms him since he has no brothers or sisters; the nearest neighbors are quite distant; and he has no pets of his own. When he discovers the fawn, he is allowed to keep it as a reward for helping to save his father, Penny, after he is bitten by a rattlesnake. Jody understands the ways of animals, partly through his friend, Fodder-Wing, and he knows the fawn will need special attention since its mother is dead. Since he has waited many years for his first pet, he has plenty of love to give. When Fodder-Wing dies, he further understands the pain of loss. He is forced to become the man of the family after Penny recovers; and when the father is injured on the job, Jody must take over the major load of the chores once again. This responsibility that is thrust upon him at such a young age gives him added understanding of the hardships and responsibilities of living in the wild. He treats the yearling as a part of the family, giving it the same type of love and understanding that he receives from his father. 

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The Yearling

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