How does Jack Potter think of himself?

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In Stephen Crane’s “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky ,” Jack Potter sees himself as a man of self-importance; “a prominent person.” As he travels from San Antonio to Yellow Sky with his wife, he enjoys telling her about the train and treating her to a meal in...

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In Stephen Crane’s “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky,” Jack Potter sees himself as a man of self-importance; “a prominent person.” As he travels from San Antonio to Yellow Sky with his wife, he enjoys telling her about the train and treating her to a meal in the diner car. When his wife asks him if the meal is too expensive for people like them he assures her that it is not as he attempts to impress her with his worldliness.

In the small town of Yellow Sky, where he is the town marshal, he is well liked and considered to be an important person.  “He knew full well that his marriage was an important thing to his town. It could only be exceeded by the burning of the new hotel.” He feels the community depends on him and loves him. His marriage will be a surprise to the town and he takes measures to keep it a secret until he can he can announce it properly to his constituents. “He was now bringing his bride before an innocent and unsuspecting community.” Even though the people of Yellow Sky marry in their own time, Jack believes that his marriage is special and will be a change for the whole town. He is so full of himself, he believes that the town band will play upon his arrival. That is, until he arrives in Yellow Sky and sneaks home with his new bride.

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