How does it matter that Roderick and Madeline are brother and sister in "The Fall of the House of Usher"?

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The major reason that it matters that Roderick and Madeline are brother and sister stems from the fact that they are twins.  Just as the lake that surrounds the Usher mansion reflects the mansion's image, this symbolism transfers into the mirror image that Roderick and Madeline would see when looking...

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The major reason that it matters that Roderick and Madeline are brother and sister stems from the fact that they are twins.  Just as the lake that surrounds the Usher mansion reflects the mansion's image, this symbolism transfers into the mirror image that Roderick and Madeline would see when looking at each other.  It is also important that the reader realizes that when Roderick and the narrator bury Madeline that they, Roderick must be aware that Madeline is still alive due to some type of "twin telepathy".  Roderick's motive for attempting to murder his sister also is important here -- he may have murdered her because he wanted to have his own identity and find independence from his sister.

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