How does incumbency affect campaign contributions elected officials receive?

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Incumbency affects the campaign contributions an official receives by increasing the number of such contributions.  In other words, an incumbent official is likely to receive a great deal more in the way of contributions than his or her opponent will.

The reason for this is that contributors do not want...

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Incumbency affects the campaign contributions an official receives by increasing the number of such contributions.  In other words, an incumbent official is likely to receive a great deal more in the way of contributions than his or her opponent will.

The reason for this is that contributors do not want to waste their money.  They know that incumbents are more likely to win in any given election than their opponents.  Interest groups do not want to waste money on someone who is likely to lose.  In addition, they do not want to antagonize an important incumbent by contributing to the incumbent's opponent.  For these reasons, incumbents get much more in contributions than their opponents do.

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