In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, how does Huck's identity evolve from what it is at beginning of novel to what he created for himself as the book progresses?

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At the beginning of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck expresses his strong desire to escape from the confines of civilized society. The Widow Douglas has taken him into her home and is teaching him how to be a proper young gentleman. He can’t stand it. By the end of the novel, we hear something very similar. He again expresses his strong desire to escape another woman (this time Aunt Sally) and her desires to raise and civilize him. He would rather be free of such reform, so he makes the decision to head west—“to light out for the Territory.”

So, in one sense, he is still the same old Huck yearning for freedom and escape from society’s rules. But during the course of the novel, he ends up spending much of his time traveling down the Mississippi River with Jim, an escaped slave. They are both running away, and their desire to join their fates is effortless and immediate. While Huck expresses some dismay when Jim tells him that he is a runaway, it doesn’t change Huck’s...

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