How does the house in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher" represent the life of its owners?How does this parallel to the story "The Fall of the House of Usher?" (eg. life vs. death...

How does the house in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher" represent the life of its owners?

How does this parallel to the story "The Fall of the House of Usher?" (eg. life vs. death of both the house and the person)

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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The relationship between the physical house and the family is first made obvious by the title, in that "the house of Usher" as a phrase can refer either to a physical house or a family (cf. House of Lancaster, House of York).

A significant literary devices used in the tale is the "pathetic fallacy" in which the outward state of nature (and in this case the house as well) reflect the inner condition of one or more characters. As the characters fall apart physically and emotionally, their physical house deteriorates.

 The physical house, as brother and sister, make the narrator uncomfortable and have a gloomy air to them. The house becomes more menacing throughout the story, with the sensitivity of Roderick to sound complemented by the increasing volume of mysterious noises from the house. The sister's breakout from the tomb disturbs the physical structure of the house. When both Usher siblings die, and the narrator leaves, the house splits ion two and is destroyed.

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