How does Henry react to his fame as the “vest-pocket monster” or the “vest-pocket million- pounder”? Describe how his situation changes his outlook and behavior, if at all.

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The narrator, Henry, begins his career as possessor of the million-pound bank note in a diffident and fearful manner. However, he soon gains confidence and begins to order more and more extravagant items, confident that he will be able to postpone payment indefinitely (or, as his tailor puts it, "eternally")...

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The narrator, Henry, begins his career as possessor of the million-pound bank note in a diffident and fearful manner. However, he soon gains confidence and begins to order more and more extravagant items, confident that he will be able to postpone payment indefinitely (or, as his tailor puts it, "eternally") when he demonstrates his wealth. By the time he becomes notorious, he admits that "it turned my head, not just a little, but a good deal." When he reaches the height of fame, being caricatured in Punch, he says that he "just swam in glory all day long."

However, while he enjoys his fame, it does not make him altogether feckless. He has been promised any situation within the gift of the brother for whom he hopes to win the bet. He therefore carefully keeps his indebtedness down to an amount which he thinks can be covered by his first year's salary, even though people are always trying to lend him money. Within the bounds of his extraordinary situation, therefore, he remains comparatively level-headed.

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