The Snows of Kilimanjaro by Ernest Hemingway

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How does Hemingway use the, "Iceberg Theory," in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro"?

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In English literature courses, the iceberg theory refers to the idea that the meaning of a work of literature is hidden under the surface; in other words, understanding what the story is about will take some digging and thorough investigation. Hemingway once wrote on his work,  “I always try to write on the principle of the iceberg . . . there is seven-eighths of it under water for every part that shows.” With works like "Hills Like White Elephants" and "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber", Hemingway certainly crafts intricate and psychologically complex stories under stories that are deceivingly simplistic.

In Hemingway's "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," which is perhaps one of the author's most notable and widely discussed works, the iceberg theory is vital in unraveling an understanding of the text. The story's protagonist , Harry, is descending into a fatal illness caused by a gangrenous infection in his leg. As the story progresses, Harry reflects on his life, particularly...

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