How does he meet Victor Frankenstein?

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Since the question doesn't specify which "he," I will focus on Captain Robert Walton, who meets Victor Frankenstein on an expedition to the North Pole. He is there in the hopes of finding "a passage . . . to those countries, to reach which at present so many months...

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Since the question doesn't specify which "he," I will focus on Captain Robert Walton, who meets Victor Frankenstein on an expedition to the North Pole. He is there in the hopes of finding "a passage . . . to those countries, to reach which at present so many months are requisite" as well as to learn the "secret of the magnet": in other words, a scientific expedition of discovery. (Although—spoiler alert—the Northwest Passage does not exist. There is no easy or quick route above North America that links the Atlantic to the Pacific, only difficult and hard-to-navigate passages through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.) One morning, Walton goes up on deck and sees his men talking to someone who is, apparently, on the ice beside the ship. He sees that a fragment of ice has drifted toward the ship during the night, and it carries one sled containing a very sickly man and his one surviving sled dog. This stranger's body is "dreadfully emaciated by fatigue and suffering"; in fact, Captain Walton says that he has never seen "a man in so wretched a condition." This man is Victor Frankenstein. Victor starts to narrate his story at the beginning of Chapter 1, where he states, initially, "I am by birth a Genevese . . . ."

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Your question is not specific concerning the "he." Are you talking about Robert Walton?

Robert Walton meets Victor Frankenstein in the North Pole while trying to dig his ship out from the ice flows. Walton's expedition parallels that of Victor's in that he blindly struggles to attain his ends while giving no thought to himself or the harm that his goals will have on anyone else.

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