Please answer the following questions about Lord Capulet.how does he intially approach juliet.what is his reaction when he finds out she will not marry paris.why has he reacted in this manner?  ...

Please answer the following questions about Lord Capulet.

how does he intially approach juliet.what is his reaction when he finds out she will not marry paris.why has he reacted in this manner?

 

when capulet approaches his daughter juliet to tell her she is to marry paris on thursday and how he gets annoyed...

Asked on by lindz1995

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pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

All of this happens in Act III, Scene 5.

Juliet's father initially approaches her by telling her to calm down and stop crying so much.  He believes that she is crying because Tybalt is dead and he thinks she is overdoing it.

When she tells him she does not want to marry Paris, he gets extremely angry.  He calls her "garbage" and "carrion" and threatens to throw her out of the house.

I believe he reacts that way because she is defying his will. In those days, a father's word was law and it would be hard to imagine a daughter defying her father like that.  In addition, if it gets out that Capulet can't control his daughter, people he knows will probably laugh at him.  So it's partly because he doesn't like to be challenged and partly because he doesn't want to look bad.

wanjira-mukami's profile pic

wanjira-mukami | High School Teacher | (Level 2) eNoter

Posted on

In  Act 3 Scene 5, The Lord Capulet approaches his daughter, Juliet, with the marriage proposal to Paris tin third person, through his wife. he expects her to be as thrilled and excited about it as they are in Lines 143-146:

Doth she not give us thanks?   Is she not proud? Doth she not count her blessed, Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought

So  worthy a gentleman to be her bride?

He is surprised, angry and shocked that Juliet does not appear to cooperate. he does not seek to understand why she does not. Instead, he excitedly lashes out at his daughter in  very disrespectful, insulting and threatening terms in Lines 161-4:

Hang the, young baggage! disobedient wretch!    I tell the what-  get thee to church on Thursday Or never look me on the face.                         Speak not, reply not,  do not answer me!

He may have reacted like that for various reasons:

  • Of the old schools that believes that women are to be seen and not heard.
  • His wife seems to indulge his every whim and is not used to strong opinionated women like his daughter
  • Is just not a deep thinking, reflective individual.

All in all, his daughter is portrayed as the more self controlled, well balanced, adult individual in this scene. Perhaps Shakespeare does that to increase the pathos of the coming tragic climax.

 

 

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