How does Hawthorne use irony in "Young Goodman Brown"?

How does Hawthorne use irony in "Young Goodman Brown"?

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There are several instances of irony in "Young Goodman Brown," most notably situational irony.

One such instance of situational irony—when an event occurs that is not what is expected—relates to the man seated at the foot of an old tree who rises and walks with Goodman, and also resembles him. Goodman believes that he is the first of his family to take the path into the woods because his relatives were pious Christians; however, "he of the serpent" (the man resembling Brown) tells Goodman that he knew the Brown family, claiming they were his good friends. Apparently, then, the Browns were not righteous people as Goodman believes.

Perhaps the most significant situational irony of the story is the fact that, all along, Goodman Brown believes that his wife Faith is a good woman to whom he will return after the one night that he goes into the forest primeval. For he declares that after he returns he...

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