In Antigone, how does Haemon attempt to reason with his father?

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Haemon tries to get Creon to see sense in order to make him realize just how potentially damaging his decision regarding Antigone could be. Haemon approaches his father in a suitably respectful manner; he is not attempting to challenge Creon's authority as king. What he is simply trying to do is point out the serious consequences that will follow if Creon goes ahead with executing Antigone. He informs Creon, quite rightly, that Antigone is immensely popular with the people of Thebes; executing her will only add to their growing discontent. Haemon is acting out of genuine love and concern for his father; he does not want to see him lose his throne over this.

However, it is important to acknowledge that Haemon's intercession on Antigone's behalf is not based on his feelings for her, but on the basis of a calm, rational assessment of the political situation in Thebes. He is acting in the capacity of a counselor, a loyal servant of his father the king, who feels duty bound to provide his master...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 667 words.)

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