How does Golding present Ralph and Jack's initial response life on the island?Consider how Golding descreibes the island, link to Ralph and Jack's response. Use of symbols - link to charaters....

How does Golding present Ralph and Jack's initial response life on the island?

Consider how Golding descreibes the island, link to Ralph and Jack's response. Use of symbols - link to charaters. Interaction between Jack, Ralph and Piggy.

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Kristen Lentz eNotes educator| Certified Educator

William Golding originally presents Ralph and Jack's initial response to life on the island as a grand adventure.  The boys make a comparison of their time on the island to The Coral Island or Treasure Island (34-35).  The Coral Island was a "children's adventure story" ("Lord of the Flies: Introduction," eNotes) that featured a group of boys stranded on an island who have all sorts of marvelous adventures.

Golding portrays the island as being lush, fruitful, and full of potential.  The boys quickly discover that the island can easily meet their basic needs:  freshwater, fruit, and meat in the form of pigs.   When Jack, Ralph, and Simon first explore the island to make look for any signs of civilization, they return to the other boys amazed at the possibilities for adventure and fun on their island:

"This is our island.  It's a good island.  Until the grownups come to fetch us we'll have fun" (35). 

 

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Lord of the Flies

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