How does Golding (lord of the flies) show you that time is passing on the island?How does Golding (lord of the flies) show you that time is passing on the island?can you guys give examples from the...

How does Golding (lord of the flies) show you that time is passing on the island?

How does Golding (lord of the flies) show you that time is passing on the island?
can you guys give examples from the book.

Also,
Do any of the boys say something that could be taken more than one way? Is there an idea (for example, the idea of the beast) that could mean/represent more than one thing?


Thanks for the help!

Asked on by decar

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coachingcorner | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

In the novel 'Lord of the Flies' by William Golding, one of the ways in which the author shows us that time is passing is by marking it with meetings - just like we do in the real 'civilized' world. The trouble is that the boys no longer have a schedule that is required by convention, social rules or routine. In their new world, time is marked more by hunger, thirst, dawn, dusk, light and dark. Ralph tries to impose some sort of order that he is used to in order to 'civilize' their surroundings to some degree at least. The 'meetings' idea soon gets dishevelled (like their hair which also shows time passing by its growth) because they have no need of clocks and none of them have any other time commitments or diaries and can spend time as they please. Ralph cries out

'Meetings. Don't we all love meetings! Every day,twice a week,we talk.' (The word 'week' is a measurement of time.)

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