How does George seem to feel about his handicap?

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George seems resigned to his handicap. He tells Hazel that he doesn't mind it anymore, as he's gotten used to wearing it. His handicap has become a part of who he is.

However, the forty-seven pounds of bird-shot padlocked round his neck is a great burden; Hazel notices that George...

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George seems resigned to his handicap. He tells Hazel that he doesn't mind it anymore, as he's gotten used to wearing it. His handicap has become a part of who he is.

However, the forty-seven pounds of bird-shot padlocked round his neck is a great burden; Hazel notices that George is often exhausted from carrying the canvas bag of bird-shot round his neck. Although Hazel wishes that they could make a hole in the bottom of the bag in order to take out a few lead balls, George isn't thrilled with the idea.

He tells Hazel that, if he's caught taking out any of the lead balls, he'll get two years in prison, and he'll be fined two thousand dollars for every ball he takes out. He also argues that he will set a bad example for others. Before long, George maintains that they'll be back to the "dark ages" where everybody competes against everybody else. He contends that society will suffer the minute everyone gets away with disobeying the laws.

George doesn't realize the irony of his statements. He and Hazel are living under a tyrannical system of laws, but he seems fine with preserving the status quo. George has been brainwashed into believing that the laws in his country are meant to preserve freedom and justice, but in reality, they do just the opposite.

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