Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell

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How does George Orwell present Poverty in 'Down and Out in Paris and London'?

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In Down and Out in Paris and London, published in 1933, Orwell chooses to live the life of a poor person. He writes:

It is a feeling of relief, almost of pleasure, at knowing yourself at last genuinely down and out. You have talked so often of going to the dogs—and well, here are the dogs, and you have reached them, and you can stand it. It takes off a lot of anxiety.

In  Paris, after pawning almost everything he owns, Orwell becomes a waiter at a large, fancy hotel patronized by wealthy people. He describes in great detail the long, hard hours, miserable conditions, and endless dirt that surrounds the food preparation. It is two different worlds on either side of the kitchen door. He describes, for example, how fast the waiters must race around, running up and down steps and through back corridors to deliver room service breakfasts to the wealthy patrons. Things are so rushed that if they drop a piece of buttered toast face down on a dirty floor, they just pick it up, brush it off, and...

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