How does Faulkner view the tradtional south, african american and feminist

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Faulkner's view of the American South is much like that of southern history, i.e., complicated. At times, his writing romanticizes the region's history. Yet on other occasions, he's a sharp critic.

Generally speaking, Faulkner's writing is respectful toward African-Americans, his liberal use of unflattering dialect notwithstanding.

Many of Faulkner's female ...

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Faulkner's view of the American South is much like that of southern history, i.e., complicated. At times, his writing romanticizes the region's history. Yet on other occasions, he's a sharp critic.

Generally speaking, Faulkner's writing is respectful toward African-Americans, his liberal use of unflattering dialect notwithstanding.

Many of Faulkner's female characters are strong-willed and run parallel with his view of African-Americans. It's almost as if Faulkner holds woman and African-Americans in higher regard than white males. Sort of this idea that those two groups, while discriminated against in many societies, hold the moral high ground.

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