In The Diary of Anne Frank, how does the fact that Anne tries to maintain a positive attitude in the Annex affect the way the readers view her?

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The fact that Anne displays a sense of progressive thought that allows her to articulate the positive in a condition that is overwhelmingly negative makes her more heroic.  The reader is stunned with so much about Anne through the diary.  I would say that her humanity is what strikes the reader.  She does not succumb to the forces of destruction and the death instinct that surrounds her.  Rather, she emphasizes the optimistic and the possibility for love to exist in the world. Consider an element written after nine months in the Annexe:

....she writes on February 23, 1944, that she looks out her window, surveying Amsterdam with its rooftops and horizon, and she notices a strip of blue sky. She writes, 'As long as this exists,' I thought, 'this sunshine and this cloudless sky, and as long as I can enjoy it, how can I be sad?'’’

This spirit of hope is seen in the last entry.  Almost deliberately reflecting the zenith of her maturation in the diary, Anne writes about the possibility for good in the world triumphing over the forces of evil, but also exploring the idea that individual change is inevitable.  There has to be a spirit of hope that embraces such change.  This spirit of progressive thought, seeking to look beyond the condition in which one is immersed into a state of being that should be as opposed to what is drives the work as a statement of redemption.  This helps to make Anne a protagonist with which the reader identifies, making her heroic given what she had to endure.

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