How does Ehrenreich fail in her experince in the low wage work environment? I need three examples from the text with page numbershelp plz!!!!!!!

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vangoghfan's profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

On page 28, Ehrenreich discusses her difficulties in making enough money to meet all her expenses, including her rent.

On page 41, Ehrenreich discusses her "slide into poverty" as a result of failing to make ends meet.

On page 185, Ehrenreich discusses her repeated failure to find cheaper places to stay during the time that she works at Walmart.

 

belarafon's profile pic

belarafon | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Here are a couple of interesting stories that might help with your thesis.

Charles Platt, novelist, worked at a Wal-Mart and had a very different experience; in particular, he mentions that he was constantly reminded to take his breaks.

Matthew Pulley, UNC student, lived in a very similar situation and believes that Ehrenreich "set herself up for failure," and so her book was a self-fulfilling prophecy.

stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

#2 is right, in my opinion - I don't think she "failed" in any of her positions. She demonstrated the difficulty of trying to survive under lower working class economic conditions, which ultimately proved not possible for her experiments. That was because she had the luxury of being able to walk away and return to her "real life" situation as an individual not solely dependent on minimum wage / no insurance employment.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I am not sure what you mean by fail. Do you think the overall experience was a failure? I think she accomplished what she set out to do, basically finding out what life was like in the working class. If you mean times she had difficulty making ends meet and succeeding in the menial jobs, that's another story.

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